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An Afternoon With Sir Doug

July 15, 2019

 

Of all the artists I’ve worked with Doug Sahm is one of the most memorable, he was a crazy character filled with music.  His close friends included Bob Dylan, who has said that Doug had one of his favorite bands. I usually called him, ‘Sir Doug,’ a moniker put on him by the "Crazy Cajun" producer, Huey P. Meaux. The British Invasion was in full swing, and Doug had recorded a great song, "She’s About a Mover." 

 

Huey feared it might get lost in the flood of English records, so he dubbed the San Antonio band, The Sir Douglas Quintet, and dressed them in English looking garb.Doug said it was cool until he spoke on stage or TV and that Texas drawl came out.  The record was a smash and Doug went back to wearing his Cowboy hat over shoulder length hair, which became his trademark.  One quick memory of life with Sir Doug:

 

I flew into San Antonio one day with some contracts for Doug to sign.  The plan was I’d meet him in the Airport, get his John Hancock, or in this case Sam Houston, and jump on the next plane out, but it didn’t work out that way.  Doug greeted me at the plane with a loud, "Hi Don welcome to SanAntone,” put his arm around my shoulder and said we were going to lunch. I tried to protest, but knew better so we went out to his car, a beautifully restored white 50’s Cadillac convertible with red leather upholstery. He explained that he knew I was in a rush, and said we’d just run over to the Pancake House at the Rodeway Inn to do our business.  It was fun riding with him in his boat-like car, long hair blowing in the wind and the radio blasting. He never stopped talking.

 

 

An Afternoon With Sir Doug

June 23, 2015

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Don Sundeen

 

Of all the artists I’ve worked with Doug Sahm is one of the most memorable, he was a crazy character filled with music.  His close friends included Bob Dylan, who has said that Doug had one of his favorite bands. I usually called him, ‘Sir Doug,’ a moniker put on him by the "Crazy Cajun" producer, Huey P. Meaux. The British Invasion was in full swing, and Doug had recorded a great song, "She’s About a Mover." 

 

Huey feared it might get lost in the flood of English records, so he dubbed the San Antonio band, The Sir Douglas Quintet, and dressed them in English looking garb.Doug said it was cool until he spoke on stage or TV and that Texas drawl came out.  The record was a smash and Doug went back to wearing his Cowboy hat over shoulder length hair, which became his trademark.  One quick memory of life with Sir Doug:

 

I flew into San Antonio one day with some contracts for Doug to sign.  The plan was I’d meet him in the Airport, get his John Hancock, or in this case Sam Houston, and jump on the next plane out, but it didn’t work out that way.  Doug greeted me at the plane with a loud, "Hi Don welcome to SanAntone,” put his arm around my shoulder and said we were going to lunch. I tried to protest, but knew better so we went out to his car, a beautifully restored white 50’s Cadillac convertible with red leather upholstery. He explained that he knew I was in a rush, and said we’d just run over to the Pancake House at the Rodeway Inn to do our business.  It was fun riding with him in his boat-like car, long hair blowing in the wind and the radio blasting. He never stopped talking.

 

Mendocino - Doug Sahm

 

The restaurant was virtually empty, with O.K. food, and Sir Doug excitedly talked about the music he was writing and the great band he had together. He also told me about this older Mexican singer/guitar player named Freddy Fender, who had a song called, ‘Wasted Days and Wasted Nights,’ and that we should sign him. We had burgers and he signed the papers without reading them, and we went back out to the car where he saw a note under the windshield wiper. 

 

"Oh no!" he yelled and handed me the note that said something like, "Caught you this time you S.O.B." He said it was from his wife and she had seen the car and figured he was in the motel with a girl.  Obviously, this was not the first time, and Doug was having a panic attack.  "You’ve got to come home with me and tell her we’ve been doing business," he said, and my protestations to the contrary fell on deaf ears. So we took off for his place at a high rate of speed.

 

Pulling up in front of a nice suburban home with kids stuff on the lawn, we saw his wife standing in the door looking very P.O’d. "This is going to cost you big time," she shouted  as Doug grabbed my arm and headed for the door. "Honey, this is Don from the Record Company, and we’ve been doing contracts. You tell her Don."  Without looking at me, but probably having met other men in the record biz, she said, "Hell, he’d lie for you."

 

After  we entered the air conditioned house, she settled down and I turned my charm up to 11, sipping iced tea.  After Doug decided he wasn’t a dead man, he offered to take me back to the airport, and thanked me profusely all the way to the terminal. What began as a quick turn-around trip, had grown into a stressful, but in retrospect, funny, memorable day.  On the plane gazing at the clouds and enjoying a cold beer, I chuckled and thought: Nobody’s going to believe this one.

Wasted Days and Wasted Nights - Freddy Fender 

​​

 

The restaurant was virtually empty, with O.K. food, and Sir Doug excitedly talked about the music he was writing and the great band he had together. He also told me about this older Mexican singer/guitar player named Freddy Fender, who had a song called, ‘Wasted Days and Wasted Nights,’ and that we should sign him. We had burgers and he signed the papers without reading them, and we went back out to the car where he saw a note under the windshield wiper. 

 

"Oh no!" he yelled and handed me the note that said something like, "Caught you this time you S.O.B." He said it was from his wife and she had seen the car and figured he was in the motel with a girl.  Obviously, this was not the first time, and Doug was having a panic attack.  "You’ve got to come home with me and tell her we’ve been doing business," he said, and my protestations to the contrary fell on deaf ears. So we took off for his place at a high rate of speed.

 

Pulling up in front of a nice suburban home with kids stuff on the lawn, we saw his wife standing in the door looking very P.O’d. "This is going to cost you big time," she shouted  as Doug grabbed my arm and headed for the door. "Honey, this is Don from the Record Company, and we’ve been doing contracts. You tell her Don."  Without looking at me, but probably having met other men in the record biz, she said, "Hell, he’d lie for you."

 

After  we entered the air conditioned house, she settled down and I turned my charm up to 11, sipping iced tea.  After Doug decided he wasn’t a dead man, he offered to take me back to the airport, and thanked me profusely all the way to the terminal. What began as a quick turn-around trip, had grown into a stressful, but in retrospect, funny, memorable day.  On the plane gazing at the clouds and enjoying a cold beer, I chuckled and thought: Nobody’s going to believe this one.

Wasted Days and Wasted Nights - Freddy Fender 

​​

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